The Dallara-Honda IR-05 Indy Car

Fast Facts Giampaolo Dallara started his design career with jobs at Ferrari, Maserati, Lamborghini and De Tomaso. While primarily interested in forging his career in designing and building racing cars, he was involved in the design of the Lamborghini Miura and Espada. Dallara started his own racing car manufacturing company in 1972 and within a few years had created Formula 3 cars that came to dominate the competition in Italy, Germany, France and Great Britain. Although Dallara did not achieve great success in Formula 1, they did become a dominant force in American Indy Car competitions. Dallara’s Indy cars started with the 1997 IR-7 and won a 1998 Indianapolis 500 win ahead of Eddie Cheever in a V8 Oldsmobile powered IR-7, with another win in 1999 for an IR-9 driven by Kenny Bräck. Dallara’s most successful Indy chassis was the IR-03, which debuted in 2003 and was upgraded in 2007 to become the IR-05. Dallara still makes racing cars and has also started making a sports car.
Dallara IR-05 Indy racing car

Image descriptionDallara-Honda IR-05 Indy racing car from 2008.

Giampaolo Dallara graduated from the Polytechnic University of Milan and joined Ferrari in 1960. In 1962 he moved to Maserati and in 1963 to Lamborghini, where he became chief designer. So in three short years he had gone from college with a major in aerospace engineering to become chief designer in a challenging position at a new and highly creative high-performance car manufacturer.

It was at Lamborghini that Giampaolo Dallara teamed up with famed engineers Paolo Stanzani and Bob Wallace, working on a “three men pet” project, a mid-engine transverse GT powered by a Giotto Bizzarrini designed 3.9 liter V12. van Lamborghini wasn’t thrilled with the idea at first, so the three engineers worked on the project in their own time, which can be a great opportunity to get to know people and learn from each other.

When Ferruccio Lamborghini finally looked at the prototype of the chassis, he approved it and so the rolling chassis was shown at the Turin Salon of 1965. To his surprise, the orders came in and so Lamborghini commissioned Marcello Gandini of the Italian design house Bertone to do the body style. The Lamborghini Miura was born and became one of the most famous and sought after cars of its time.

Dallara IR-05 Indy racing car

Image descriptionThe ad for the “Hole in the Wall” camps is for Paul Newman’s camps for children with serious health problems.

Dallara’s work before moving to Lamborghini mainly involved racing car chassis: at Ferrari he had worked with Giulio Alfieri, the technical manager of the racing department, and at Maserati he had worked on designing the chassis for racing cars.

Ferruccio Lamborghini had no interest in racing and in 1969, when Dallara left Lamborghini, he would move to De Tomaso, where he worked on a new chassis for a Formula 2 car, which was so successful that it designed the chassis for the De Tomaso. Formula inspired. 1 car.

Dallara made the big breakthrough in 1972 and founded his own company to specialize in his first love – racing cars: hence the name Dallara Automobili da Competizione.

Giampaolo Dallara’s new company created chassis for various forms of motorsport, including sports car racing and hillclimbs, and in an advisory role in the creation of the 1973 Williams Formula 1 car. Dallara became the constructor of the BMS Scuderia Italia Formula 1 racing team. 1988-1992 and created a chassis for Honda to test before their proposed return to Formula 1 in 1999: Honda ultimately decided not to return to Formula 1 at that point.

His greatest success, however, was the design and manufacture of a Formula 3 racing car chassis that made its debut in 1981. That chassis built a formidable reputation in Dallara’s home country with a series of Formula 3 championships.

Dallara IR-05 Indy Race Car Honda V8 Engine

Image descriptionThe Honda Racing V8 engine.

Dallara became a Formula 3 force to be reckoned with from 1993 with the introduction of the Dallara F393 chassis (i.e. 1993 Formula 3). This chassis achieved near dominance in Formula 3 in Italy, France, Great Britain and Germany, and in the Macau Grand Prix.

In Formula 1, Dallara worked for a number of teams in campaigns, most notably the money-poor Hispania team, which did not produce any spectacular successes. Dallara would not be involved in Formula 1 again until April 2014 when Gene Haas (not to be confused with Carl Haas of Newman Haas Racing) started his own Formula 1 team and he teamed up with Dallara to build his first car. This was the Haas VF-16 Formula 1 car and made its debut in February 2016.

However, dating back to 1997, Giampaolo Dallara has had no remarkable success in the ethereal sphere of Formula 1, and decided to enter the world of Indy racing and try his hand at that hugely exciting world of power and speed. , richly laced with American V8 engines. and colorful personalities.

Dallara began supplying chassis for the Indy Series competition teams in 1997 with its IR-7 model. This remained the basic design on which his later IR-8 and IR-9 updated models were based.

Dallara IR-05 Indy racing car

Image descriptionRear suspension and transmission of the Dallara IR-05.

Success was fairly immediate for Dallara in Indy Series racing with an Indianapolis 500 win for Eddie Cheever in a V8 Oldsmobile powered IR-7 in 1998, and another win in 1999 for an IR-9 driven by Kenny Bräck.

Dallara created a new second-generation chassis for the new millennium, the first of the new series called the IR-00 (for the year 2000), followed by a third-generation chassis design in 2003 – hence the name IR-03.

The IR-03 was built using a monocoque carbon fiber body/chassis and featured a double wishbone suspension. It was replaced in 2007 by the updated IR-05, which was essentially an upgrade kit for the IR-03.

The IR-05 introduced paddle-operated gear lever mounting on the handlebars, revised aerodynamic fittings to adapt the car to a variety of track types, from city streets to high-speed ovals. The IR-03/IR-05 chassis also had the means to change the wheelbase of the car to adapt it to different racing environments.

Dallara IR-05 Chassis #001

The #001 Dallara IR-05 was purchased by the Newman/Haas Indy Car racing team for the 2008 season, a season that marked a historic turning point for Indy Car racing as Indy Car and Champ Car competition resumed after 12 years. were reunited. schism.

For the 2008 race, the Newman/Haas/Lanigan race team chose Graham Rahal as their second driver. Paul Newman was a man eager to help young drivers get off to a good start in their motorsport careers and so Newman/Haas Racing had a history of providing that kind of support to drivers they thought had great promise.

Graham Rahal was the son of Bobby Rahal, who had been an Indianapolis 500 winner and three-time CART (Championship Auto Racing Teams) champion. Despite his young age, he had already gained considerable racing experience by sinking his teeth into Formula Atlantic racing and progressing to the 24 Hours Daytona and 12 Hours of Sebring American Le Mans Series in 2007.

Graham Rahal’s first success of the 2008 season was a victory at the Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, where the Dallara IR-05 was fitted with a Honda Racing V8 engine. At 19 years and 93 days, he was the youngest driver to win a major American road race.

The Dallara IR-05 that drove Graham Rahal to victory will be put up for sale by RM Sotheby’s on October 29, 2022 as part of the sale of the Newman/Haas collection of race cars.

You will find the sales page for the 2008 Chassis #001 Dallara-Honda IR-05 with more details by clicking here.

Dallara IR-05 Indy racing car

Image descriptionSide view of the Dallara IR-05 advertising the “Hole in the Wall” camps.

On the side of the car you see advertising for the “Hole in the Wall Camps”. The Hole in the Wall Gang camps were founded by Paul Newman for children with serious health problems. The camps continue to this day and you can find the website here.

Giampaolo Dallara’s company today produces race cars for Indy Car, Indy Lights, FIA Formula 2 and 3, Super Formula, Super Formula Lights, Euro Formula Open, ELMS, NASCAR and IMSA Weathertech Sportscar.

Dallara also produces their own rather interesting looking road sports car, the Dallara Stradale, which you can find on their homepage.

Dallara IR-05 Indy racing car
Dallara IR-05 Indy racing car
Dallara IR-05 Indy Race Car Honda Race V8 Engine
Dallara IR-05 Indy Race Car Honda Race V8 Engine
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Photo credits: All photos of the Dallara IR-05 Chassis #001 courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.

Jon-Branch-Author-Profile-Image

Jon Branch has written numerous official auto buying guides for eBay Motors over the years, he has also written for Hagerty, is a longtime contributor to Silodrome and the official SSAA Magazine, and is the founder and editor of Revivaler.

Jon has done radio, television, magazine and newspaper interviews on a variety of topics, and has traveled extensively, having lived in the UK, Australia, China and Hong Kong. The fastest he ever drove was a Bolwell Nagari, the slowest was a Caterpillar D9 and the most challenging was a 1950s MAN trailer with unexpected brake failure.

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